Media > 3-D Printers Bring Historic Instruments Back To The Future
September 11th, 2015

standard 3-D Printers Bring Historic Instruments Back To The Future

Sina Shahbazmohamadi places a 3-D printed copy of a recorder foot joint into a measuring device in a lab at the University of Connecticut's Center for Clean Energy Engineering.Peter Morenus/UConn

Sina Shahbazmohamadi places a 3-D printed copy of a recorder foot joint into a measuring device in a lab at the University of Connecticut’s Center for Clean Energy Engineering.
Peter Morenus/UConn

In a recital hall at the University of Connecticut in Storrs, a group of musicians got together to play Jean-Baptiste Singelée’s 1857 quartet for saxophones on some very old, very special instruments.

“This is an Adolphe Sax saxophone, from the mid-1860s,” says Robert Howe, who collects antique wind instruments. He’s also a reproductive endocrinologist and M.D. who’s now a Ph.D. candidate in music history and theory at UConn. About five years ago, it occurred to him that CT scans, X-rays and similar medical technology might also be used to examine the anatomies of antique oboes, flutes and saxophones. Full story.

Tom Verde (NPR Music) / May 2, 2015

Weblink : http://www.npr.org/
Photo credit : http://www.npr.org/

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